Wedding Invitation Line         
 represented by On Paper 
       Hand done Wedding Calligraphy     
        
When and Why of Stationery           Invitation Checklist 
        
Sample wording for wedding invitations, rehearsal dinners, receptions       
        
Expenses Itemized         Planning Calendar

onpaperline@yahoo.com

>

Addressing Envelopes

   How you choose to address your invitations helps to define the style and ambiance of your wedding. A very formal event would follow the standard guidelines for addressing invitations, irregardless of the relationship to the guest.
   Inner envelopes are addressed using the persons’ titles and last name. The exception are minor children who are listed by first name under the parents’ names.
 
   
Always address in neat, legible handwriting, using a guideline if needed, to keep the lines of writing straight. Professional calligraphers may also be hired.

Rules and guidelines are constantly evolving, although there are some expected, standard guidelines. Here are some FAQs:


Should I have a return address printed on the back flap of the invitation’s outer envelope?
Yes! The U.S. Postal Service suggests that all first-class mail have a return address. It gives the wedding guest an address to which to send a reply (If you don’t use reply cards) or a gift. Also, it ensures that you will know if the invitation does not reach its destination as it will be returned to the sender.

What abbreviations can be used?
In the past, the only acceptable abbreviations were Mr., Mrs., Dr., and army rank. Ms. has become accepted. Names of cities and states are written out in full.

How do you address the outer envelope when you are inviting a family with young children?
The outer envelope should be addressed with only the parents recognized. It is becoming increasingly common to add “and Family” after the parents’ names. On the inner envelope, under the parents’ names, write the first names of the children: 
                              Mr. And Mrs. Smith 
                              John and Mary
Children ages sixteen and older should get their own invitation.

shown above: Italic calligraphy on an outer envelope
($1.75 per set: inner and outer envelopes)
shown below: Celtic calligraphy on an outer envelope
($2.25 per set: inner and outer envelopes)


How do you spell....?
orrect spellings of the 50 states of the
United States of America, military addresses
and US territories

How do you address the outer envelope of an invitation to a married couple if the woman has kept her maiden name?
If the woman kept her maiden name, address the envelope with both names on the same line if space permits:
                              Mr. William Greenberg and Ms. Laura Vegas
                              28 Brookview Avenue

How do you address the outer envelope of an invitation to an unmarried couple living together?
For an invitation to an unmarried couple living together, list their names alphabetically on separate lines without “and.”
                              
Mr. William Greenberg
                              
Ms. Laura Vegas
                              28 Brookview Avenue

How do you address the outer envelope when you want a guest to bring “a friend?”
If the guest’s friend’s name and address are known, a separate invitation may be sent directly. Or, if only the name is known, the friend’s name could also be listed under the guest’s name on the inner envelope. The outer envelope would be addressed to your guest only.

How do you address the outer envelope to two doctors?
If you are sending an invitation to two persons of the same last name both of whom are medical doctors, you address the envelope to:
                              
The Doctors Smith
The same form is used if both are Ph.D.s and use the title.

How do you address the outer envelope to a widow or separated woman?
If you are sending an invitation to a widow or a woman who is separated, address the envelope as Mrs. John Smith.